April 22, 2017

Workshops

The ACC will offer workshops addressing current and future topics in automatic control from experts in academia, national laboratories, and industry. The workshops at ACC 2020 will take place prior to the conference on Monday June 29 and Tuesday June 30 at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel. Room locations will be listed in a few weeks.

Conference registrants can sign up for the workshops directly through the registration site. For additional information about Workshops, please contact Workshops Chair, Belinda Batten (belinda.batten@oregonstate.edu). Please note that workshops are subject to cancellation due to lack of registrants.

Workshops on Tuesday June 30, 2020

Half-day workshop (8:30 am – 12:30 pm)

W1: System Modeling and Control with Smooth Fuzzy Compositions
Organizer: Ebrahim Navid Sadjadi, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

Half-day workshop (1:30 pm – 5:30 pm)

W2: Secure State Estimation and Control of Cyber Physical Systems: An Unknown Input Observer Approach
Organizers: Stefen Hui, San Diego State University; Stanislaw Zak, Purdue University

Full-day workshops (8:30 am – 5:30 pm)

W3: Current Topics in Aerospace Control
Organizers: Richard A. Hull, Collins Aerospace; Naira Hovakimyan, University of Illinois; Zhihua Qu, University of Central Florida; Ilya V. Kolmanovsky, University of Michigan; Heather Hussain, The Boeing Company; Venanzio Cichella, University of Iowa; Dimitra Panagou, University of Michigan; Amit Sanyal, Syracuse University; D. Brett Ridgely,  Raytheon Missile Systems

W4: Process Control using First-Principles Models – Cancelled
Organizer: R. Russell Rhinehart, Oklahoma State University

W5: Practical Methods for Real World Control Systems
Organizers: Daniel Abramovitch, Agilent Technologies; Sean Andersson, Boston University; Craig Buhr, Mathworks

W6: Confluence of Vision and Control
Organizers: Ashwin Dani, University of Connecticut; Nicholas Gans, University of Texas at Arlington

W7: Exploring Interplay between Dynamical Systems and Function Spaces: A Unifying Presentation of Dynamics Mode Decomposition and Occupation Measures
Organizers: Rushikesh Kamalapurkar, Oklahoma State University; Joel A. Rosenfeld, University of South Florida

W8: Extremum Seeking Control in Biomedical Applications
Organizers: Nicholas Gans, University of Texas at Arlington; Saurav Kumar, University of Texas at Dallas; Robert Gregg, University of Michigan

W9: Task-Oriented Autonomous Vehicular and/or Manufacturing Operations
Organizers: Xiang Chen, University of Windsor; Jay A. Farrell, University of California Riverside; Kok-Meng Lee, Georgia Institute of Technology; Fumin Zhang, Georgia Institute of Technology

Workshops on Monday June 29, 2020 and Tuesday June 30, 2020 (8:30 am – 5:30 pm both days)

Two-day workshop

W10: Model Predictive Control – Cancelled
Organizers: Thomas A. Badgwell, ExxonMobil Research & Engineering; James B. Rawlings, University of California Santa Barbara

Workshop Details

Half-day (June 30, 2020)

W1: System Modeling and Control with Smooth Fuzzy Compositions

Organizer: Ebrahim Navid Sadjadi, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

The objective of this half-day workshop is to cover the state-of-the-art in smooth fuzzy modeling and control algorithms along their systemic properties and the applications.
During the last years, we have witnessed major successes of fuzzy logic systems in the academia and industries. From beating professionals at games like chess, to fast detection of diseases like cancer, classification of complex images, and generation of captions for images in the personalized media of the incomplete and noisy information. In many AI fields, fuzzy systems could outperform all existing machine learning and model-based control methods. Three major aspects of fuzzy systems make the design methodology attractive. The first is the design formulation, that they can be understood, tuned, or improved by engineer’s experiences and knowledge. The second aspect is the ability to handle the system disturbances and noises soft and smoothly, which facilitate the operation of industrial processes inside their margins and operational limits. The third aspect is the ability to perform on-line decision making for the processes, considering their affordable computational complexities. Hence, the purpose of providing this workshop is to provide a detailed introduction to the fundamental developments in this field for researchers, graduate students and practitioners. The main focus of the course is on the design of smooth fuzzy models for various applications which include control, modelling, and self-learning for the dynamical systems, as well as the comprehensive study of the new achievement in study of their structural properties.

Presenters: E. N. Sadjadi, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid; M. B. Menhaj, Amirkabir University of Technology

Prerequisite skills for participants: Linear algebra and basic knowledge of optimization and stabilization theories. No knowledge of fuzzy logic is required.

W2: Secure State Estimation and Control of Cyber Physical Systems: An Unknown Input Observer Approach

Organizers: Stefen Hui, San Diego State University; Stanislaw Zak, Purdue University

In this workshop, the theory, design, and applications of estimators for the states and unknown inputs of control systems will be presented in a tutorial fashion. The workshop targets both practicing engineers and graduate students. The emphasis will be on design in order to show how uncertain system control theory fits into practical applications. Observation and measurement play essential roles in achieving control objectives in many control schemes. An observer is a deterministic dynamical system that can generate an estimate of the plant’s states using that plant’s inputs and outputs. Observers are utilized to augment or replace sensors in a control system. The early observers required full knowledge of the inputs of the controlled plant. Observers that do not require full knowledge of the inputs have also been developed and are collectively called Unknown Input Observers (UIO). Some uncertainties, nonlinearities, and delays in the system model can be treated as unknown inputs. Methods for the estimation of the unknown inputs have been developed. One important application of UIOs of current interest is in secure state estimation of network control systems corrupted by malicious packet drops both in the communication between the sensors and the controller and that between the controller and the actuators. Another area of application of UIOs is fault detection and isolation, which is also one of the topics of this workshop. We will present an unknown input estimator architecture that reconstructs sensor and actuator faults. Novel robust discrete-time (DT) observer architectures will also be presented. We will demonstrate how these observers are used in the synthesis of combined controller-observer compensators for continuous-time (CT) systems. The advantage of the compensator synthesis in the DT domain over the CT domain is that in many cases the condition for the existence of an UIO fails for a CT plant model while it holds for a discretized plant model. We will characterize a class of systems for which the existence condition for the UIO fails in the CT domain while it holds in the DT domain.

Prerequisite skills for participants: Basic knowledge of linear systems at the undergraduate level. No prior knowledge of observers is assumed.

One-day (June 30, 2020)

W3: Current Topics in Aerospace Control

Organizers: Richard A. Hull, Collins Aerospace; Naira Hovakimyan, University of Illinois; Zhihua Qu, University of Central Florida; Ilya V. Kolmanovsky, University of Michigan; Heather Hussain, The Boeing Company; Venanzio Cichella, University of Iowa; Dimitra Panagou, University of Michigan; Amit Sanyal, Syracuse University; D. Brett Ridgely,  Raytheon Missile Systems

This one-day workshop will focus on current control system topics that are having an impact in the aerospace industry. The workshop will be presented by leading control systems experts from industry and academia that are involved in some of the most exciting research and development efforts in the field of Aerospace. This workshop is intended for students and professors in search of current applications in need of solutions as well as industry and government professionals interested in potential solutions from academia and adjacent branches of the aerospace industry. This workshop is sponsored and presented by members of the IEEE CSS Technical Committee on Aerospace Controls and their collaborators. The purpose of the technical committee is to help build an international scientific community and promote awareness of outstanding achievements in the field of Aerospace Controls. In this offering, the workshop will present a sample of current topics related to the intelligent control of cooperating groups of unmanned air vehicles, spacecraft, drones and miniature projectiles. Our experts will present the theoretical background, rigorous methods and experimental results that are creating an exciting new chapter in field of Aerospace Control. Recent advances in adaptive and nonlinear robust control theory are used to form the basis for safe, resilient and certifiable systems of co-operative platforms. Future directions for research are included in discussion of the roles of artificial intelligence and augmented and virtual reality, as well as emerging applications in Aerospace Control for adversarially robust cyber resistant systems. The workshop will offer opportunities for questions and answers and provide an open forum for discussion of applications for current theoretical advances and potential enabling technologies.

Please see http://aerospace-controls.ieeecss.org/home for additional information and agenda, follow the tab to TCAC Workshop on Aerospace Control – 2020 ACC.

Presenters: Richard A. Hull, Collins Aerospace; Naira Hovakimyan, University of Illinois; Zhihua Qu, University of Central Florida; Ilya V. Kolmanovsky, University of Michigan; Heather Hussain, The Boeing Company; Venanzio Cichella, University of Iowa; Dimitra Panagou, University of Michigan; Amit Sanyal, Syracuse University; D. Brett Ridgely, Raytheon Missile Systems; James Fisher, Raytheon Missile Systems

Prerequisite skills for participants: Solid foundation in classical and modern control methods plus an interest in Aerospace applications.

W5: Practical Methods for Real World Control Systems

Organizers: Daniel Abramovitch, Agilent Technologies; Sean Andersson, Boston University; Craig Buhr, Mathworks

A question one should ask of any advanced algorithm is, “How do we make that work in a real system?” A question one should ask of any industrial control system is, “How do we apply better algorithms to this problem?” The two questions are dual sides of the same “bridging the gap” problem that has hounded control for decades. This workshop will examine practical methods that address this problem from both sides: ways to implement advanced algorithms on real systems and ways to improve industrial control using advanced methods. We will examine which system identification methods work on which physical systems, as model-based control requires a model. We will discuss why so many industrial controllers are PIDs, present a universal framework for different PID implementations, describe how to tune the PID to the identified system model, and show how to augment these with higher order controller dynamics (a.k.a. filters). We will discuss how to make state-space models more useable in real-time systems. Speaking of which, we will explain how to program filters and PIDs in real-time control systems. We will discuss things to know about hardware implementation and tradeoffs with ADCs, DACs, and analog filters. We will talk about the current set of real-time processing chips and the programming models that go along with them. Throughout we will offer hardware/software demonstrations of how tools like Matlab and Simulink can be used in these contexts. We won’t bridge the gap in a day, but we can move the needle. A web page that holds the information from the brochure can be found here, and a PDF version of the workshop flyer can be found here.

Prerequisites skills for participants: Undergraduate level knowledge of feedback systems, sampled data systems, and programming. An honest interest in being able to translate control theory into physical control systems.  The workshop is designed to be useful to industry practitioners wishing to apply more advanced control methods as well as academics wishing to make their algorithms more applicable to real world problems.

W6: Confluence of Vision and Control

Organizers: Ashwin Dani, University of Connecticut; Nicholas Gans, University of Texas at Arlington

The use of visual sensors in feedback control has been an active topic of research for decades.  As the cost of hardware lowers and computational capabilities increase, vision-based control is reaching new levels of capability and application. Recent innovations in computer vision can provide greater capabilities to control applications such as autonomous vehicles and robots.  At the same time, open problems in computer vision can be solved through control theory, such as nonlinear and adaptive control.  We present eleven discussions on recent work in vision-based control, the application of control to computer vision, and topics in which vision and control are uniquely intertwined.  We seek to highlight recent developments and open problems that exist at the intersection of vision and control and spur further research and development in the community. Further information on the workshop can be found at

https://sites.google.com/view/2020accworkshop

Presenters: Randy Beard, Brigham Young University; Ashwin Dani, University of Connecticut; Warren Dixon, University of Florida; Kaveh Fathian, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Nicholas Gans, University of Texas at Arlington; Takeshi Hatanaka, Osaka University; Guoqiang Hu, Nanyang Technological University; Romeil Sandhu, Stony Brook University; Roberto Tron, Boston University; Eddie Tunstel, University of New Mexico; Patricio Vela, Georgia Institute of Technology

Prerequisites skills for participants: A basic understanding of vision-based control/estimation, nonlinear and adaptive control is beneficial. For the registrants who do not have sufficient background in these topics, basic tutorial material will be provided prior to the workshop.

W7: Exploring Interplay between Dynamical Systems and Function Spaces: A Unifying Presentation of Dynamics Mode Decomposition and Occupation Measures

Organizers: Rushikesh Kamalapurkar, Oklahoma State University; Joel A. Rosenfeld, University of South Florida

Two different perspectives of casting problems for finite dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems into infinite dimensional linear problems have been gaining significant traction over the past decade. Specifically, these two approaches are that of Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD), which aims to establish “equation-free” models from snapshots of a dynamical system by exploiting properties of the Koopman operators over Hilbert function spaces, and that of Liouville operators and occupation kernels, where nonlinear optimal control problems are reformulated as infinite dimensional linear programs. The purpose of this workshop is to bring together practitioners of both fields together to enable a unifying discourse concerning nonlinear dynamical systems and their connections to infinite dimensional spaces. The presentations will include topics such as DMD, moment problems, Reproducing Kernel Hilbert spaces, and Lyapunov measures. The workshop will conclude with several talks connecting DMD with Liouville operators using newly introduced occupation kernels. This workshop aims to provide a comprehensive treatment of Dynamic Mode Decompositions and moment problems using Occupation Measures. The attendees will leave with a thorough understanding of how to cast finite dimensional nonlinear problems into infinite dimensional linear problems and will understand this approach from multiple perspectives. Attendees who are already familiar with both methods will be introduced to occupation kernels and Liouville operators which can be leveraged to blend DMD with the theory of occupation measures via a Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space framework.

Presenters: Rushikesh Kamalapurkar, Oklahoma State University; Henning Lange, University of Washington; Jean B. Lasserre, LAAS-CNRS; Joel A. Rosenfeld, University of South Florida; Benjamin P. Russo, Farmingdale State College; Umesh Vaidya, Iowa State University; Ram Vasudevan, University of Michigan

Prerequisite skills for participants: Experience with Banach and Hilbert space theory, including measure theory, kernel spaces, and operators as well as some experience with dynamic programming and optimization.

W8: Extremum Seeking Control in Biomedical Applications

Organizers: Nicholas Gans, University of Texas at Arlington; Saurav Kumar, University of Texas at Dallas; Robert Gregg, University of Michigan

Biomedical systems are notoriously difficult to model. This difficulty stems from the variation in physiology between subjects. Furthermore, an individual subject will often vary over the course of a day, a week, etc. This difficulty in modeling makes it difficult to implement optimal control solutions. Extremum Seeking Control (ESC) is a method of model-free adaptive control that modifies the arguments of a cost function to guide them to a local maximum or minimum. The versatility and model-free nature of ESC makes them very well suited for biomedical control applications. We will present nine recent results in applying ESC to a wide variety of biomedical problems, including powered prosthetics and orthotics, medication delivery, rehabilitation therapy, and assistive heart pumps. We seek to highlight the strengths of ESC in biomedical applications and spur further research and development in the community who may not have considered this powerful approach. The workshop will include an introductory session for those unfamiliar with ESC, and we will provide tutorial papers on the workshop webpage, https://sites.google.com/view/esc4biomed.

Presenters: Victor Duenas, Syracuse University; Hosam Fathy, University of Maryland; Nicholas Gans, University of Texas at Arlington; Robert Gregg, University of Michigan; Martin Guay, Queen’s University; Saurav Kumar, University of Texas at Dallas; Peiman Naseradinmousavi, San Diego State University; Miroslav Krstic, University of California San Diego; Tiago Roux Oliveira, State University of Rio de Janeiro; Ying Tan, University of Melbourne

Prerequisite skills for participants:  A general knowledge of adaptive and nonlinear control will be helpful.  The workshop will include an introductory session for those unfamiliar with ESC, and we will provide tutorial papers on the workshop webpage.

W9: Task-Oriented Autonomous Vehicular and/or Manufacturing Operations

Organizers: Xiang Chen, University of Windsor; Jay A. Farrell, University of California Riverside; Kok-Meng Lee, Georgia Institute of Technology; Fumin Zhang, Georgia Institute of Technology

This one-day workshop will focus on major problems facing the design framework for autonomous vehicular and manufacturing operation, involving the following topics:

  • Modeling field sensing and perception such as visual, LIDAR, and soft sensor based on
  • deformation and temperature field reconstruction,
  • Smart actuator based on modular design and embedded field sensors,
  • Visual sensor guided autonomous vehicular formation operations,
  • Networked sensing and estimation for ground and underwater autonomous vehicular systems,
  • Task-oriented autonomous unmanned aerial vehicular operations.

The presented talks by invited speakers are to provide updates of frontiers in these topics and to collectively present the design philosophy of task-oriented autonomous operations seen in vehicular and manufacturing systems.

Workshop information can be found here.

Presenters: Kun Bai, Huazhong University of Science and Technology; Xiang Chen, University of Windsor; Jay Farrell, University of California Riverside; Jingjing Ji, Huazhong University of Science and Technology; Kok-Meng Lee, Georgia Institute of Technology; Hugh H. T. Liu, University of Toronto; Fumin Zhang, Georgia Institute of Technology

Prerequisite skills for participants: Background in one or more areas of estimation, control, optimization, UAV, robotics, and field (visual, thermal, laser, etc.) sensing is preferred but not mandatory.  Anyone interested in autonomous systems and operations is welcome to participate.

 

For more information about workshops please contact:

Workshops Chair
Belinda Batten

Oregon State University
belinda.batten@oregonstate.edu